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Kyndra Miller from CannaBusinessLaw.com

Kyndra Miller is an attorney with CannaBusiness Law, Inc. in California, a Cannabis Activist, and one of the founding Board Members of NORML Women’s Alliance Foundation, Inc.. I sat down and talked with her about her legal practice and why she’s so passionate about legal cannabis reform and educating women in the industry.

Q: What sort of law do you practice?

I started out practicing civil litigation with an emphasis in entertainment law in Los Angeles, CA. I primarily represent film & television producers. I assist them with their general corporate needs and business structures. I expanded my entertainment firm about five years ago and rented an office at Pier 5 Law Office in San Francisco, CA. It was the influence of the attorneys at Pier 5 that encouraged me to get involved with the drug reform movement and open CannaBusiness Law, Inc..

Currently, I represent medical marijuana patients who are interested in forming a collective or cooperative.

Q: What makes you a Ganjier?

I think what makes me eligible or even somewhat qualified to be a Ganjier is the combination of activism and legal services that I offer. When I first started CannaBusiness Law, Inc., the first thing I told my business manager at the time was I need to find a marijuana reform organization that I can align with in order to become an activist.

Because to me, it’s not just about being an attorney and charging people to help them with their particular legal need. I am interested in actually changing the law. And Jerry Wilkerson (my manager at the time) found NORML Women’s Alliance. You know, I’m a self-proclaimed feminist, have been since I was an undergrad. Working with women and grassroots causes is something that is near and dear to my heart. Last year, Madeline Martinez, Greta Gaines and I placed a motion before the NORML Board of Directors requesting the right to establish a separate Cannabis reform organization by women, and for women. The NORML Board unanimously approved the motion and now NORML Women’s Alliance is a separate – but equal – organization from NORML. I am honored to work with women across the country and around the globe about the many reasons why we need to change our relationship with this plant.

So, I really think that it’s through my activism and being on the ground talking to people – and listening to their concerns – that has made me a better attorney.

Q: What’s your opinion on cannabis?

From a personal standpoint, I think it’s a miracle plant! Cannabis is a political threat to some of the organized governmental and corporate structures that are currently in place. Although I have had a relationship with cannabis since I was a teenager, I believe that Cannabis consumption is a matter of personal freedom for adults who want safe access to the plant and all of its benefits.

As an attorney, I got involved because I believe that Cannabis prohibition is closely linked to civil rights issues. When I first began to take a good look at the war on drugs and the communities that are predominantly affected by law enforcement, it became immediately obvious that black and brown communities are disproportionately affected by prohibition. Here’s the good news – the political tide is constantly changing. And, Cannabis is winning!

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As part of the Ganjier Media's founding team, Allison served as the first editor-in-chief of TheGanjier.com and executive producer of events like the Golden Tarp Award and the Ganjier Spring Kickoff. She owns Eris & Edrington Writing Company and has provided media consulting services for businesses and political candidates. She is also the Cannabis Editor for The Clever Root magazine. As a “recovering journalist,” she has contributed to major publications including The New York Times, The SOMM Journal, and Skunk Magazine. She has previously worked as a staff writer for daily newspapers, covering local elections, Humboldt cannabis policy, city government and criminal court cases.

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