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Light Dep Farming with Cannabis and veggies
Light Dep Farming with Cannabis and veggies

Did you miss Part 1?

Our total food disconnect has created a vast sense of unease that we’ve tried to fill culturally with antidepressants. We wouldn’t be depressed as a people if we were engaged in our traditional means of being.

For centuries, we’ve defined life around labor, and the means of production produced tangible goods for the public. Now, it’s about what we do on our weekends and time off. We work in order to get to the other things in life, and this is a fundamentally flawed outlook on reality.

Grandma wanted out of the kitchen because the work is hard and drudging, but what we didn’t know is that the replacement is a pale shade of the real thing.

When America moved from a production economy to a service and information based economy, folks lost the ability to produce with their hands and this created a deep sense of anomie. Studies have shown that use of the hands to create or accomplish tasks during the course of daily activities serves to activate the dopamine-seratonin-epinephrine rewards system in the brain. We feel good when we work with our hands, and this doesn’t apply to sitting in a cubicle working on a computer.

We’re built to be outside, participating in the rhythm of the seasons and the magic of Mother Nature. Knowing which way the wind is blowing, and what it means for the day before we go outside. How to grow our own food, raise our meat and hunt wild game.

Real Food Has Fat (and Flavor!)

Our skills are being stripped away from us one at a time so we become helpless pawns purchasing consumer products with no other means of surviving. It’s hard to find food products of the same quality as what you could grow yourself if you set your energy to it.

By definition, if someone is going to make money off raising something and selling it to you, either you could do it for yourself cheaper, better or both. If the seller is using all the quality practices you’d use yourself, the cost will be higher and the product of higher quality than if you bought something similar from a cost-cutter. You could produce it for cheaper yourself because you wouldn’t be paying the cost of someone’s time and other overhead that is factored into the price.

Eating real food takes more work than throwing a box in a microwave but yields infinitely better results.

If you purchase a low-cost product, then it won’t have been produced with the highest quality standards (otherwise it would cost more because the adage ‘you get what you pay for’ totally holds true). We’ve become a society of low-quality producers dedicated to selling cheap wares.

We used to know that buying something was as investment and the item could be handed down to our children. Now we buy something with the hope of getting three to five years of use out of it. This absurd, throwaway culture has directly affected the way we perceive food; what we expect to pay for it, and the poor-quality that we’ve chosen to accept as a people.

As a kid, I was a non-vegetable eater because store-bought vegetables (especially non-organic ones) usually don’t taste very good. You can’t fool kids, that whole “eat it, it’s good for you” argument doesn’t hold any water. And it shouldn’t! Good quality food TASTES GOOD! If you start with fresh, high-quality ingredients, you kinda have to work to mess it up.

Who Should Have the Responsibility of Choosing Your Food Sources?

Which brings us back around to the core question of responsibility. As a culture, we’ve been more than happy to hand off control of our food, medicine, fuel and shelter because it has generally meant less work overall for each of us. Everyone has gotten very used to enjoying evening TV instead of spending hours cooking, preserving and processing food, bringing in firewood and doing the varied other chores that keep a homestead operating.

Eating real food takes more work than throwing a box in a microwave but yields infinitely better results. We have to relearn all the little tricks, like how to coax extra meals out of a chicken carcass. We need to remember how to produce multiple meals at a time, and how to make use of leftovers and all the little pieces. Grandma wanted out of the kitchen because the work is hard and drudging, but what we didn’t know is that the replacement is a pale shade of the real thing. By ceding responsibility for ourselves, we’ve created a vacuum that power-hungry bureaucrats and greedy corporate interests have been more than happy to fill for us.

Having already abdicated our responsibility, it’s going to be a helluva struggle to win our rights back. We need to assert our food and medicine sovereignty and demand that the government allow us to produce and distribute and consume for ourselves as we see fit unless we choose to shop at large-scale, certified, supermarket-type operations.

 

Did you miss Part 1?

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