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Photo from Unsplash via @kylellefson https://unsplash.com/@kylellefson
Photo from Unsplash via @kylellefson https://unsplash.com/@kylellefson

Companion planting in gardening and agriculture is the planting of different crops in proximity for pest control, pollination, providing habitat for beneficial creatures, maximizing use of space, and to otherwise increase crop productivity. Companion planting is a form of polyculture. – Wikipedia

As spring rolls around and we are all prepping our garden and getting everything ready for one of the biggest years of all our lives, its time to start thinking about how to supercharge your soil life. Instead of looking to new ways to farm we must remember this is a cultural practice we’ve always done. We’ve all heard of crop rotation to improve soil health, but how many of us actually practice this? One way we can implement this age old technique is through cover cropping.

By Kazvorpal [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
By Kazvorpal [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

“The roots of your cover crop are already feeding your soil life…”

By planting a spring crop of things like: vetch,beans,red clover,peas,barley and alfalfa we can get some early high nitrogen producing plants to deposit nitrogen back into our soil. This revitalizes our soil after a long winter of being dormant. Then in May or June when you get ready to put your plants in their final garden bed or pot you whack down your cover crop and harvest the beans and peas for your food and leave the rest over your dirt as a green manure or mulch. The roots of your cover crop are already feeding your soil life then when you leave the chopped green manure it will slowly break down and feed your plant as well as conserving water by covering the soil.

“…Herbs like basil, oregano, and chamomile increase resin production and dramatically increase the flavor of your cannabis. …”

We’ve all heard its important to choose your friends wisely, its the same with planting around your cannabis. We want to surround our plants with plants that will increase the cannabis resin production as well as repel unwanted pest and deposit important nutrients. Herbs like basil, oregano, and chamomile increase resin production and dramatically increase the flavor of your cannabis. Sunflowers deposit nitrogen and encourage the cannabis to grow in a almost race to the sun.

Photo from Unsplash via @budding https://unsplash.com/@budding
Photo from Unsplash via @budding https://unsplash.com/@budding

Companion planting is a technique which has been practiced for thousands of years and there are numerous lists on the web of plants that grow well and don’t grow well together. I always check the list and although cannabis is not on it tomatoes is which is close relative. Usually the same plants that grow well with tomatoes also grow well with cannabis. Growing a diversified garden also protects plants from disease and pests. Mono cropping or growing a crop of just one species allows bugs to turn your cannabis into a buffet. While diversifying your garden brings in a range of different beneficial insects to protect your most valuable and beloved crop, your buds!

4 COMMENTS

  1. Hey thanks for sharing, I think we all need more understanding of companion planting. I am wondering how you came to the conclusion that basil , chamomile and oregano improve resin production?

    Also have you ever planted dill or lemon balm as a companion to repel insect pests?

    Peace

    • “Chamomile is sometimes known as “the plant doctor”, because it is thought to help the growth and health of many other plants, especially ones that produce essential oils. It is thought to increase production of those oils, making certain herbs, like mints (spearmint, sage, oregano) and basil taste stronger in scent and flavor.” I took this little bit of information and considering Cannabis is a plant that produces essential oils I applied it and it worked! I just do a lot of research, then put it into practice and see what works for me.

  2. I work at a nursery and we have a lot of home cannabis growers. We had a wetter than usual winter and pests, namely russet mites, have been really bad this summer. Are there any other companion plants you’d recommend to repel harmful insects? How about attracting beneficial bugs? I’ve always heard lavender and yarrow good. Will either of these impact marijuana flavor? What about marigolds?

    • This is a great question because so many people have this problem, I use tomatoes as a sort of decoy. I find that the mites will attack my tomatoes and completely leave my cannabis alone. Like Deer and most bugs they choose tomatoes first, and although its sad I did lose a few tomato plants to russets I have a completely healthy ganja garden which is all grown in the same area, maybe 10 feet away at most.

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